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-   -   Korea's Mixture of Golf and Culture (http://www.mylpga.com/forum/f24/koreas-mixture-golf-culture-5850.html)

bangkokbobby 12-28-2009 11:42 PM

Korea's Mixture of Golf and Culture
 
The Seoul Sister fan in me has to think about this a bit before offering my comments...

original link: Korea's mixture of golf and culture truly a world apart - USATODAY.com

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ctmurray 12-29-2009 07:57 PM

Brutal winters and 200 golf courses - just like Minnesota. Except the most expensive courses are $150 per round (and I don't play those).

bangkokbobby 12-29-2009 10:43 PM

It's no wonder the pressure is so great on LPGA (and PGA) players from Korea. I always think it's a red flag when a family spends their entire capital trying to develop a sports star. The percentages are staggering of how few people will actually achieve that goal. And even if they do become a professional, to make big money as one of the best is a fight with the best in the world. To tell a child, no matter what country or culture, that their success or failure will make or break the family is cruel.

That said, this article doesn't speak of the junior programs aimed at helping kids develop. I don't know if that lessens the financial burden...in this way I mean, are the parents who chose the expensive coaches and pull their kids out of school and spend money upon money upon money to develop their child thinking the more they spend the better the child will become...are there programs in Korea that will develop a child that are more financially feasible? I'll have to ask HF, but I don't think Se Ri Pak came from a rich background. How did she make it? On ss.com's Se Ri page, it states that Se Ri's family couldn't afford club membership, so all the practice she had on real courses was during tournament practice rounds. The rest of her practice was just driving ranges. So maybe the super expensive route isn't always the route that achieves the best success...

bangkokbobby 12-29-2009 10:49 PM

How much do Koreans love their women golfers? Well...here is the Korea Times list of Top 10 domestic and international stories...and at #2 domestic was the Korean performance on the LPGA...it outranked a Korean winning the Nobel Peace Prize...the suicide of a former President...even North Korean nuclear testing...NORTH KOREAN NUCLEAR TESTING!!!!

...that's some serious ladies golfer love...

original link: [Top 10 Stories] Events That Marked First Decade of 21st Century

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greentee 12-30-2009 08:16 AM

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The tension part is culture for sure, and well take awhile to lessen, as its hard to change 100's of years of old habits overnight.

Koreans, as a nation, have had to struggle in their past to survive and to have any chance to get ahead in life. For they have had to contend with many other invading countries, who have attempted to assimilate them into their own nationalities

That they are a country in this modern world, is testament to their endurance and discipline, (which in short is focus),... which unfortunately also does bring tension. One of the sayings, or slogans I see often is "Korea Fighing'.... and there is a deep pride of survival as a nation here.

If a parent sees relaxing in a child, or being 'at ease', it is assumed they are not focusing enough, thus more pressure. That is culture, but culture of the past though. As time goes on, and as more Korean parents understand more of the differences of cultures worldwide, I think this hard pressure well ease off from parents. For as that article above says... they are starting to see the downside of too much nose to the grindstone.

Yet there is also the high monetary cost to produce, which needs a pay-back of some sort. There is always this pressure on the child to give back... and when they can't, they begin to feel personally that they are a failure.

Over all though, I think things well change for the better for parent and child, and also in many of the other specific country culture issue areas as well. Its just a matter of time. All things change, some just slower then others.

Golf is evolving world wide, and so well the Korean players, and their parents. Maybe us to. (Just my present personal opinion, and not necessarily anyone else's). :-)


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