Go Back   LPGA Golf Forum > Other Discussions > Anything

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-29-2012, 09:49 PM   #1
Donating Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,551
Any Bowlers out there?

Bowling is my "winter sport". Anyone else bowl regularly? What's your average? What is the league (men's, women's, mixed)? How are wins and losses calculated? How many bowl each time? How many on the team?

In my case I have a 194 average now, it is going down slowly, I had my highest series a few weeks ago (723) and highest game (277). In the past the average has been between 180 and 190.

It's a men's league. We bowl three players per night, three games per night. There are 7 bowlers on my team. Everyone has busy schedules and it is sometimes hard to even get three bowlers. Couple of retirees but mostly working at my company and they can be called out of town for work with short notice. We have averages from about 120 to 190.

In this league it is a handicapped match play event, between individuals and total scores. So you are matched against the person on the opposite team bowling in the same position in the line up (so the highest average bowler goes last, lowest first for both teams). So each game you can win a point, and a point for total handicap score for three games. Then the team total scores are matched for each game, worth two points. So a total of 20 points.

My team is often in last place, but a couple of years ago we got into the playoffs and won. Most of the bowlers are associated with my place of work so I see many of the bowlers at work throughout the year.
ctmurray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2012, 09:26 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2,147
CT
Ya...I'm averaging 152 on the Wii....lol.

Use to bowl the odd weekend when we were 16 because we were too young to sneak into the bars.

I like bowling....5 pins with the grand boys, but I prefer 10 pin.
Mr3putt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2012, 11:03 PM   #3
Donating Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,551
What is 5 pin? Just starting with 5 pins (the center ones?)?

When I was a kid I went candle pin bowling with my Dad. It was (still is?) an east coast variation where the pins are skinnier and the ball smaller (you hold in the palm of your hand, no finger holes). You get the throw three balls per frame. Scores are much lower as strikes are rare and spares hard. But you can pick up splits from the first toss.
ctmurray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 12:12 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2,147
CT
What you described is 5 pin bowling....I think most know it as 5 pin.
Mr3putt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 12:39 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
IceCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Shirley, MA
Posts: 851
Originally Posted by Mr3putt View Post
CT
What you described is 5 pin bowling....I think most know it as 5 pin.
Nope: the two are distinct from each other and from 10 pin

Five-pin bowling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Candlepin bowling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And I was certainly surprised to learn that candlepin bowling was invented in Worcester, MA!

Kevin
__________________
Citizen of Red Sox Nation
Loyal member of Team PJE


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WImLU31G2o8
IceCat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 02:51 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Samuel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 125
Originally Posted by ctmurray View Post
In my case I have a 194 average now, it is going down slowly, I had my highest series a few weeks ago (723) and highest game (277). In the past the average has been between 180 and 190.
Amazing scoring average, never look down, keep it up, you are almost a pro. !!

Bowling is my favorite sports, when I was young, I was a very good bowler, I bowled 300 twice, finished 279 twice, 278 once, & 250+ for many times. In old days, I can play 20-30 games a day, I just like to bowl, enjoy the tournaments & gamble with others. From my 17s to early 20s, I averaged about 205 per game, but didn't play much since then, also since I haven't played a single for years, I guess 160 would be a great number for me if I still have the touch :)
Samuel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 02:46 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
dangerbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 6,528
Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
Amazing scoring average, never look down, keep it up, you are almost a pro. !!

Bowling is my favorite sports, when I was young, I was a very good bowler, I bowled 300 twice, finished 279 twice, 278 once, & 250+ for many times. In old days, I can play 20-30 games a day, I just like to bowl, enjoy the tournaments & gamble with others. From my 17s to early 20s, I averaged about 205 per game, but didn't play much since then, also since I haven't played a single for years, I guess 160 would be a great number for me if I still have the touch :)
So, Samuel...when you were young, were you a horny toad?
__________________
"On this hapless EARTH
There's small SINCERITY of mirth
And LAUGHTER oft is but an ART
To drown the outcry of the HEART!"


Let's eat Grandpa.
Let's eat, Grandpa.

Commas save lives!
dangerbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 07:59 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2,147
Ice
Thx for the clarification.

Never knew 5 pin is just a Cdn game....I've never seen candlepin and only 10 pin bowled once in the US.....while pasting time b4 dinner.
Mr3putt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 08:28 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 2,147
Here's something else I like that we don't have in Canada.

Cheerleaders at a hockey games....WTF....hockey is Canada's game....yet no 'extras'.
All we do is burn our city down after losing the Stanley Cup....Vancouver riots....Luongo our goalie s_cks.

Twitter

Bam Bam is dropping the puck tonight and I hope she gets a nice Lighting's jersey vs. a cheese ball T-shirt.

Other things I like about the US.
- Generally a lower tax rate/base....love Oregon...no sales tax.
- More choices when shopping for groceries, clothing, etc.
- Sausage & biscuits on the breakie menu at McD's in the US south.
- Cheaper gas and booze.
- Tailgating at football games.
- Hawaii

Have I missed anything else?
Mr3putt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2012, 09:36 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
dangerbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 6,528
Originally Posted by Mr3putt View Post
Other things I like about the US.
- Generally a lower tax rate/base....love Oregon...no sales tax.
- More choices when shopping for groceries, clothing, etc.
- Sausage & biscuits on the breakie menu at McD's in the US south.
- Cheaper gas and booze.
- Tailgating at football games.
- Hawaii

Have I missed anything else?
Here's one positive thing for the Canadian people:

These are the 10 most educated countries in the world.

10. Finland
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 1.8% (3rd lowest)
> GDP per capita: $36,585 (14th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 3.15% (10th lowest)

Finland is a small country relative to the other OECD members. The share of its adult population with some sort of postsecondary education, however, is rather large. This select group is reaching the end of its expansion. From 1999 to 2009, the number of college-educated adults increased only 1.8% annually — the third-smallest amount among all OECD countries. Finland is also one of only two countries, the other being Korea, in which the fields of social sciences, business and law are not the most popular among students. In Finland, new entrants are most likely to study engineering, manufacturing and construction.

9. Australia
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 3.3% (11th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $40,719 (6th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 14.63% (3rd highest)

Australia’s population grew 14.63% between 2000 and 2009. This is the third-largest increase among OECD countries. Its tertiary-educated adult population is increasing at the much less impressive annual rate of 3.3%. Australia also spends the sixth-least amount in public funds on education as a percentage of all expenditures. The country also draws large numbers of international students.

[More from 24/7 Wall St.: Ten Cities Crushed by the Global Recession]

8. United Kingdom
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 4.0% (9th highest)
> GDP per capita: $35,504 (16th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 3.47% (13th lowest)

Unlike most of the countries with the highest percentage of educated adults, the UK’s educated group increased measurably — more than 4% between 1999 and 2009. Its entire population only grew 3.5% between 2000 and 2009. One aspect that the UK does share with a number of other countries on this list is relatively low public expenditure on education institutions as a percentage of all educational spending. As of 2008, 69.5% of spending came from public sources — the fourth-smallest amount among OECD countries.

7. Norway
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): N/A
> GDP per capita: $56,617 (2nd highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 7.52% (14th highest)

Norway has the third-greatest expenditure on educational institutions as a percentage of GDP, at 7.3%. Roughly 23% of that is spent on tertiary education. In Norway, more than 60% of all tertiary graduates were in a bachelor’s program, well more than the U.S., which is close to the OECD average of 45%. The country is one of the wealthiest in the world. GDP per capita is $56,617, second only to Luxembourg in the OECD.

6. South Korea
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 39%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 5.3% (5th highest)
> GDP per capita: $29,101 (13th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 3.70% (14th lowest)

[More from 24/7 Wall St.: The Worst Product Flops of 2011]

Korea is another standout country for its recent increase in the percentage of its population that has a tertiary education. Graduates increased 5.3% between 1999 and 2009, the fifth-highest among OECD countries. Like the UK, this rate is greater than the country’s recent population growth. Korea is also one of only two countries — the other being Finland — in which the most popular fields of study are not social sciences, business and law. In Korea, new students choose to study education, humanities and arts at the greatest rates. Only 59.6% of expenditures on educational institutions come from public funds — the second-lowest rate.

5. New Zealand
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 40%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 3.5% (14th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $29,871 (14th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 11.88% (8th largest)

New Zealand is not a particularly wealthy country. GDP per capita is less than $30,000, and is the 14th lowest in the OECD. However, 40% of the population engages in tertiary education, the fifth-highest rate in the world. The country actually has a rapidly growing population, increasing 11.88% between 2000 and 2009. This was the eighth-largest increase in the OECD. Part of the reason for the high rate of tertiary graduates is the high output from secondary schools. More than 90% of residents graduate from secondary school.

4. United States
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 41%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 1.4% (the lowest)
> GDP per capita: $46,588 (4th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 8.68% (12th highest)

The U.S. experienced a fairly large growth in population from 2000 to 2009. During the period, the population increased 8.68% — the 12th highest among OECD countries. Meanwhile, the rate at which the share of the population with a tertiary education is growing has slowed to an annual rate of 1.4% — the lowest among the 34 OECD countries. Just 71% of funding for educational institutions in the country comes from public funds, placing the U.S. sixth-lowest in this measure. Among OECD countries, the largest share of adults with a tertiary education live in the United States — 25.8%.

3. Japan
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 44%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 3.2% (10th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $33,751 (17th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 0.46% (6th lowest)

In Japan, 44% of the adult population has some form of tertiary education. The U.S. by comparison has a rate of 41%. Japan’s population increased just 0.46% between 2000 and 2009, the sixth-slowest growth rate in the OECD, and the slowest among our list of 10. Japan is tied with Finland for the third-highest upper-secondary graduation rate in the world, at 95%. It has the third-highest tertiary graduation rate in the world, but only spends the equivalent of 1.5% of GDP on tertiary education — the 17th lowest rate in the OECD.

[Also see: College Majors that are Popular]

2. Israel
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 45%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): N/A
> GDP per capita: $28,596 (12th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 19.02% (the highest)

Although there is no data on the percentage of Israeli citizens with postsecondary education dating back to 1999, the numbers going back to 2002 show that growth is slowing dramatically compared to other countries. In fact, in 2006, 46% of adults ages 25 to 64 had a tertiary education. In 2007 this number fell to 44%. Only 78% of funds spent on educational institutions in Israel are public funds. The country is also only one of three — the other two being Ireland and Sweden — where expenditure on educational institutions as a proportion of GDP decreased from 2000 to 2008. Israel also had the largest increase in overall population, approximately 19% from 2000 to 2009.

1. Canada
> Pct. population with postsecondary education: 50%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 – 2009): 2.3% (5th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $39,070 (10th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 – 2009): 9.89% (10th highest)

In Canada, 50% of the adult population has completed tertiary education, easily the highest rate in the OECD. Each year, public and private expenditure on education amount to 2.5% of GDP, the fourth-highest rate in the world. Tertiary education spending accounts for 41% of total education spending in the country. In the U.S., the proportion is closer to 37%. In Israel, the rate is 22%. In Canada, nearly 25% of students have an immigrant background.

The 10 Most Educated Countries in the World - Yahoo! Finance

No. 1 as the most educated country in the world! And probably when it comes to men...the horniest!
__________________
"On this hapless EARTH
There's small SINCERITY of mirth
And LAUGHTER oft is but an ART
To drown the outcry of the HEART!"


Let's eat Grandpa.
Let's eat, Grandpa.

Commas save lives!

Last edited by dangerbob; 01-31-2012 at 09:43 PM.
dangerbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:17 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2009, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2 PL2

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Valid CSS!